Date-Line

CARTER's Family History via New Zealand

  
Including movements of H.M. 55th and 58th Regiments of Foot, the Royal New Zealand Fencible Corp and the Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment.

1573 | 1742 | 1781 | 1799 | 1801 | 1817 | 1820 | 1821 | 1822 | 1823 | 1824 | 1825 | 1827 | 1828 | 1830 | 1831 | 1832 | 1834 | 1835 | 1836 | 1837 | 1839 | 1840 | 1842 | 1843 | 1844 | 1845 | 1846 | 1847 | 1848 | 1849 | 1850 | 1851 | 1853 | 1854 | 1855 | 1858 | 1859 | 1860 | 1861 | 1862 | 1863 | 1864 | 1865 | 1867 | 1868 | 1869 | 1870 | 1871 | 1873 | 1875 | 1876 | 1877 | 1878 | 1879 | 1881 | 1882 | 1883 | 1884 | 1885 | 1886 | 1887 | 1888 | 1889 | 1891 | 1894 | 1895 | 1896 | 1897 | 1899 | 1901 | 1902 | 1904 | 1910 | 1913 | 1914 | 1918 | 1919 | 1923 | 1924 | 1927 | 1928 | 1929 | 1931 | 1946 | 1947 | 1948 | 1950 | 1957 | 1958 | 1959 | 1960 | 1963 | 1964 | 1966 | 1968 | 1969 | 1972 | 1980 | 1990 | 1995 | 1996 | 2002 | 2006 | Bottom of page

1573
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On 2 November, Raffe (Robert) CARTER married Alice LOWNDES in Swanbourne, Buckinghamshire, England.

1742
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About 1742, John PAGDINE [PAGDEN] was born in England.
Picture: Manchester 1750

1781
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On 2 November, Johann Heinrich Wilhelm PETERS was born in Germany.

1799
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About this time Charles Jefferson BESWICK was born at Stockport, Cheshire County, England.
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1801
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The census of 1801 gave the population of Manchester Township as 70,409; and the out-districts as follows: Ardwick 1,762, Beswick 6, Blackley 2,361, Bradford 94, Burnage 383, Cheetham 752, Crumpsall 452, C-on-M 675, Didsbury 619, Gorton, 1,127, Harpurhey 118, Hulme 1,677, Levenshulme 628, Moss Side 150, Moston 618, Newton Heath 1,295, Openshaw 339, Rusholme 726, Withington 743.

1817
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On 16 May, Georg Edward PETERS was born in Hamburg, Germany.

1820
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On 17 August Charles Jefferson BESWICK joined as a new recruit H.M. 55th (Westmorland) Regiment of Foot. [Discharge Document]
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In September Charles Jefferson BESWICK was present as a recruit at Manchester, England. [3rd quarter 55th Foot muster return]

1821
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In September Charles Jefferson BESWICK was present at Chatham, England. [3rd quarter 55th Foot muster return]
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In December Charles Jefferson BESWICK embarked for the Cape of Good Hope, South Africa, on board the transport "Earl Balcarra". [4th quarter 55th Foot muster return; Page 71, George Noakes 34th, 55th Foot History]

1822
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During February/March two divisions of the 55th Foot arrived at the Cape of Good Hope and were quartered in Cape Town, South Africa. [Page 71, George Noakes 34th, 55th Foot History]
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In June Charles Jefferson BESWICK was present at Cape Town. [2nd quarter 55th Foot muster return]

1823
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Birth of Christina McKellar, later MacVicar [McVicker], in England.
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1824
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Birth of Thomas COPLEY, at Tickhill, Yorkshire, England.
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On 18 April, Edmund WOODWARD, was born in Dursley, England.

1825
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Archibald MacVICAR [McVICKER], was born (England).
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Mary COPLEY, was born in Manchester, England.

1827
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In September, the 55th Foot marched to Graham's Town, South Africa. [Page 73, George Noakes 34th, 55th Foot History].

1828
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In June, the 55th Foot marched to Fort Beaufort, 3 days march from Graham's Town, where an expedition to Kaffroria was being formed. [Page 73, George Noakes 34th, 55th Foot History].
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In July, the 55th Foot began penetration into the interior, across the rivers: Chumie, Keiskama, Buffalo, Goonobies, Kie and Bashie. [Page 73, George Noakes 34th, 55th Foot History].
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On 27 August, the 55th Foot arrived on the banks of the Umtata, where the Kaffirs, eluding pursuit, had assembled in large numbers. [Page 73, George Noakes 34th, 55th Foot History].
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On 28 August, the 55th Foot and other forces under the command of Colonel Henry Somerset attacked, slaughtered and dispersed the tribesmen assembled. [Page 73, George Noakes 34th, 55th Foot History]
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On 14 September, the Kaffroria expedition returned to their respective stations, the 55th Foot reaching Graham's Town. [Page 73, George Noakes 34th, 55th Foot History].
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1830
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In May, the 55th Foot returned to Cape Town to prepare for service in India. [Page 73, George Noakes 34th, 55th Foot History].
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In August, Charles Jefferson Beswick , with four divisions of the 55th Foot Regiment embarked for India. [3rd quarter 55th Foot muster return; Page 73, George Noakes 34th, 55th Foot History].
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In October,the four 55th Foot divisions arrived in Madras, India, from the Cape of Good Hope, joining three companies already arrived from the 55th Foot depot in England which was now reduced from four companies to one. On disembarking, the 55th Foot Regiment formed the garrison of Fort St.George. [Page 73/74, George Noakes 34th, 55th Foot History].
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In December, Charles Jefferson Beswick , was present at Madras, India. [4th quarter 55th Foot muster return].

1831
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On 27 July 1831, Pte. Charles Jefferson Beswick and Catherine McNeil married at Bellary, India. Witnesses: John Morgan and Mary Winder. Chaplain/Clergyman: R. Denton. [Return of Marriages in H.M. 55th Regiment of Foot from 1st July to 31st December 1831 Bellary 19th March 1832].
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In October, the 55th Foot marched for Bellary, India. [Page 74, George Noakes 34th, 55th Foot History].

1832
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In March, Charles Jefferson Beswick, was present at Bellary, India. [1st quarter 55th Foot muster return].
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On 10 September, Charles Jefferson Beswick, was promoted to corporal at Bellary. [Discharge Document; 3rd quarter 55th Foot muster return].

1834
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On 23 January, Harriet Beswick, was born in Bellary, India, to Charles J. Beswick and his first wife, Catherine McNeil.
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On 20 February, Harriet Beswick, was baptised in Bellary, India, by Chaplain J. Cubitt. Sponsors: Lance-sergeant William Daly, Ann Curdwell and Elizabeth Creer.
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On 24 February, the 55th Foot Regiment received orders to join the northern division of a force of seven thousand men under the command of Brigadier-General Lindsay, that was about to commence operations against the Rajah of Coorg (Kodagu) who had begun hostilities against the Indian Government. The force was composed of three divisions, each divided into a main and an auxiliary column, which were to enter the territories of Coorg (Kodagu) in different directions and meet at the capital of Mercara. [Page 74, George Noakes 34th, 55th Foot History].
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On 10 March, Five companies of the 55th Foot made up of three hundred rank and file under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Mill, marched from Bellary, together with the 31st Madras Native Infantry, and some guns of the European Foot Artillery. [Page 74, George Noakes 34th, 55th Foot History].
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In March, Charles Jefferson Beswick, was engaged on field service in Coorg (Kodagu). [1st quarter 55th Foot muster return].
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On 30 March, the attachment of forces including five companies of the 55th Foot Regiment reached, by forced marches, Kenchumah Oas Cottah, just outside the enemies territory, where the division had assembled. In addition to the 55th Foot companies, the main column was now composed of the 9th and 31st Regiments Madras Native Infantry, the rifle company of the 24th Regiment Madras Native Infantry, two hundred Sappers, and a detachment of artillery with two guns. The force was under the command of Colonel Gilbert Waugh, of the Hon. East India Company. [Page 74, George Noakes 34th, 55th Foot History].
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On 1 April, the Northern main column entered Coorg (Kodagu) territory, the 55th Foot acting as the advanced guard. [Page 74, George Noakes 34th, 55th Foot History].
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On 3 April, after continued contact with enemy forces the advance guard of the main column, which now consisted of 80 men of the 55th Foot under Captain Batty, sixty men of the 9th and 31st Native Infantry, and a party of sappers, arrived around noon in front of the fortified position of Soamwar Pettah where they encounted strong resistance that necessitated a reinforcement of one hundred men of the 55th Foot under Captain Warren that was supplemented shortly afterwards by the remainder of the Regiment under Colonel Mill who took over command. The 55th Foot reinforcements were forced into retreat, suffering severe losses, to their former encamping ground three miles distant. [Page 76/77, George Noakes 34th, 55th Foot History].
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On 6 April, the main column of the expedition commanded by Brigadier-General Lindsay, entered the Capital of Mercara. of five columns, only Brigadier-General Lindsay's column and one other managed to force their way through enemy defences. [Page 77, George Noakes 34th, 55th Foot History].
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On 7 April, with the war now virtually at an end the column at Soamar Pettah under the command of Colonel Waugh, recommenced its march through the evacuated stockade joining Brigadier-General Lindsay at Mercara on the morning of the 8 April. [Page 77, George Noakes 34th, 55th Foot History].
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On 17 April, an escort, of which the 55th Foot took a part, arrived at Bangalore with the exposed Rajah of Coorg (Kodagu) and his family. The ex-Rajah was afterwards removed to Benares, where he was permitted to reside, receiving an allowance fitted to support a household suitable to his altered position. [Page 77, George Noakes 34th, 55th Foot History].
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On 17 April, the 55th Foot escort departed Bangalore. [Page 77, George Noakes 34th, 55th Foot History].
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From March through to May Charles Jefferson Beswick was engaged on field service in Coorg (Kodagu). [1st quarter 55th Foot muster return].

1835
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In November, Charles Jefferson Beswick, contracted disease at Bellary without known cause. [Discharge Document].
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1836
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On 19 January, Charles Jefferson Beswick was promoted to Sergeant at Bellary. [1st quarter 55th Foot muster return].
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During October and November, Charles Jefferson Beswick was sick at Bellary. [4th quarter 55th Foot muster return].
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On 17 October, the 55th Foot departed Bellary. [Page 77, George Noakes 34th, 55th Foot History].
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On 23 November, the 55th Foot arrived at Secunderabad where they remained for more than three years, during which time they experienced much severe sickness. [Page 77, George Noakes 34th, 55th Foot History].
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In December, Charles Jefferson Beswick was present at Secunderabad. [4th quarter 55th Foot muster return].

1837
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In June, Charles Jefferson Beswick was reduced to private at Secunderabad. Reason: "Drunk as orderly sergeant of his Regiment". [Discharge Document; 2nd quarter 55th Foot muster return].

1839
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During November and December, Charles Jefferson Beswick was enroute from Secunderabad to Poonamalle. [4th quarter 55th Foot muster return].

1840
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On 20 January 1840, Charles Jefferson Beswick embarked for England. [4th quarter 55th Foot muster return].
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In July, Charles Jefferson Beswick was present at Fort Pitt, Chatham, England - an invalid depot from which men were discharged. [2nd quarter 55th Foot muster return].
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On 4 July, Charles Jefferson Beswick was discharged to out-pension at Fort Pitt, Chatham. [4th quarter 55th Foot muster return].
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1842
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On 1 August, Charles Jefferson Beswick married Harriet Rowland in the Collegiate and Parish Church, Manchester, England. [Extract from Lands and Deeds Department, Auckland: Dated 01 August 1899; Marriage Records, Manchester].

1843

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58th (Rutlandshire) Regiment of Foot

On 10 March, Edmund Woodward joined as a recruit H.M. 58th Foot battalion at Chatham. [1st quarter 58th Foot muster return].
Rutlandshire Regt. Cap Badge
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On 5 July, Henry Beswick was born to Charles Jefferson Beswick and Harriet Rowland.
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In July, the 58th Foot Regiment was ordered to New South Wales (Australia), going out in fifteen different transports as convict guards. The first detachment embarked July 1843, Headquarters followed in May 1844, the remainder of the regiment did not leave England until January 1845. [Short History of the 58th Regiment]. See: 58th Regiment - Arrivals and Departures
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On 31 August, Edmund Woodward embarked at Deptford the "Duke of Richmond" for New South Wales. [3rd quarter 58th Foot muster return; "Discharged in New Zealand" by Hugh and Lynn Hughs].

1844
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On 23 January, Henry Beswick died, son of Charles Jefferson Beswick and Harriet Rowland.
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On 24 January, Edmund Woodward disembarked the "Duke of Richmond" at Sydney - Paid in England to 7 January 1844 and on full rations to 5 January 1844. [lst quarter 58th Foot muster return;"Discharged in NZ" by Hugh and Lyn Hughs]. See: 58th Regiment - Arrivals and Departures
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During March, Edmund Woodward was present at Windsor, New South Wales. [1st quarter 58th Foot muster return].
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In June, Edmund Woodward was present at Sydney, New South Wales. [2nd quarter 58th Foot muster return].
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Throughout September, Edmund Woodward was present at Parramatta, New South Wales. [3rd quarter 58th Foot muster return].
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In November, Edmund Woodward was on detachment in Sydney, New South Wales. [4th quarter 58th Foot muster return].
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On 9 November 1844 - the bargue "Agincourt" arrived Norfolk Island. "Agincourt", a barque, 958 tons, built London 1841 , Class A1. Captain Neatby, Surgeon Chas. Hy. Fuller. From Woolwich 8th July, Cape of Good Hope 24th September and Norfolk Island the 12th inst. Passengers Capt H A Russell, 58th Regt, Mrs Russell, two sons and daughter, Lieutenant G H Page, 49 rank and file of the 58th Regt, 7 women and 13 children and 2 private of the 51st Regt. (with 224 male convicts, arriving Norfolk Island 9 November 1844 with 220, four having died on the voyage. Voyage took 123 days.) [58th Regt. Arrivals and Departures - see also The Shipping Gazette and Sydney general trade list, Volume 1, Number 36 - 23 November, 1844].
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During December, Edmund Woodward was on detachment at Norfolk Island. [4th quarter 58th Foot muster return].
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1844-46 Period leading up to the "Childs Mutiny" at Norfolk Island.
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1845
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In March, Edmund Woodward was present at Parramatta. [1st quarter 58th Foot muster return].
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On 23 April 1845, the greater part of the 58th Foot Regiment arrived in Auckland, New Zealand, under the command of Major Cyprian Bridge. While in New South Wales, a mounted troop was formed to deal with bush-rangers. [Short History of the 58th Regiment].
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In April, Edmund Woodward was in hospital at Norfolk Island. [2nd quarter 58th Foot muster return].
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In June, Edmund Woodward was on detachment to Norfolk Island. Of the 58th Regiment present on the Island at this time were: 1 Major, 2 Captains, 3 Lieutenants, 2 Colour-Sergeants, 11 Corporals and 110 Private soldiers. [2nd quarter 58th Foot muster return].
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On 9 August 1845, Elizabeth was born to Charles Jefferson Beswick and Harriet Beswick.
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During 1845, affairs in New Zealand were in a very disturbed state, the Maori under the leadership of Heki had rebelled against the British Government and in March had captured and burnt the town of Kororareka, one of the chief European trading centres of the North Island. [Short History of the 58th Regiment]. Note: An extra edition of the New Zealander newspaper was published 19 November 1845 "in order to give a perfect narrative of the occurrances connected with the native rebellion, up to the present time; and also, other than very important information relative to the condition of the Colony." See: Paperspast Online
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During May through to July, the 58th Foot Regiment, or portions of it, were constantly engaged against the Maori or rebel natives, some of the encounters being of a most sanguinary nature. At the assault of Ohaiawhai on the 1st July 1845, the Grenadiers and another company under the command of Major Bridge, had one officer (Captain Grant) and 15 men killed, besides 40 men wounded. [Historical Records of the 58th Foot Regiment by R. Wallace (1893)].
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On 6 October, Lt.-Col. Wynyard, with the remainder of the 58th Regiment, arrived in New Zealand. [Historical Records of the 58th Foot Regiment by R. Wallace (1893)]. See: 58th Regiment - Arrivals and Departures
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On 14 November, the new Governor of New Zealand, Captain Grey, arrived in Auckland from Adelaide on the sloop Elphinstone. [The New Zealander - 15 November 1845]. Note: In 1843 Robert FitzRoy was appointed Governor of New Zealand, replacing Governor Hobson, who had died in 1842.
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Troops - We perceive by the Hobart Town papers, that the Commissariat in Van Dieman's Land, are entering into contracts for the conveyance of 8 officers and 212 non-commissioned officers and privates from Norfolk Island, of the 58th Regiment, to New Zealand; and likewise, for the removal hence, of the detachments of the 99th Regiment, for Sydney, and of the 98th Regiment to Launceston, the United Service Gazette for June, mentions that the 11th Regiment were under orders to embark for Van Dieman's Land, and that the 8th Regiment would shortly follow. In the debate, on the New Zealand question, Mr. G. W. Hope, stated in the House of Commmons, that the destination of the former regiment would be direct to New Zealand. [The New Zealander - 15 November 1845].
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On 5 December, Edmund Woodward boarded the "Louisa" at Norfolk Island. [4th quarter 58th Foot muster return;"Discharged in NZ" by Hugh and Lyn Hughs).


On 23 December, Edmund Woodward disembarked the "Louisa" at Auckland, New Zealand. ["Discharged in NZ" by Hugh and Lyn Hughs].
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During November and December, as the Chiefs Heki and Kaiwiti still refused to submit, it was decided to reduce the great Pah at Ruapekapeka (Bat's nest) and a column of 1,100 Europeans and 450 friendly Maori was formed under Colonel Despard. The force consisted of 58th and 99th Regiments with detachments of Royal Artillery, Royal Engineers, Royal Navy, Marines, a contingent from East India Company's Artillery and Navy and some Colonial volunteers. They had with them three 32-pounders and one 18-pounder, a few field guns and rockets. [Short history of the 58th Regiment].
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On 31 December, the column of forces, including detachments of the 58th Regiment, arrived at Ruapekapeka after dense forest and precipitous hills obstructed the advance, while water was scarce and bad. [Short history of the 58th Regiment].
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1846
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On 11 January, the greater part of the 58th Regiment under Colonel Wynyard assisted at the capture of the native fortress of Ruapekapeka. This Pah was only reached after great exertions, the heavy guns being dragged through the woods and over several rivers by the men. At the assault the advanced piquet of the 58th, under Captain Denny and Ensign Wynyard, had the honour of being the first inside the Pah. [Historical records of the 58th Regiment by R. Wallace].
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During January, the Chiefs Heki and Kaiwiti sued for peace which was granted and the 58th, leaving a detachment of 200 men at the Bay of Islands, returned to Auckland were they were warmly welcomed by the inhabitants. [Short history of the 58th Regiment].
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During March, Edmund Woodward was on detachment at the Bay of Islands. [1st quarter 58th Foot muster return].
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Queen's Birthday, Auckland, May 1846.
Photo: Troops parading outside the Albert Street Barracks (now Albert Park) circa 1846.
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In 1846, conditions of enlistment for the Royal New Zealand Fencible Corp. were posted in camps in England, Scotland and Ireland. Volunteers were offered a free passage to New Zealand for themselves and their families. Each family was to receive a cottage of two rooms and an acre of land. Land and a cottage was allotted in one of the following areas: Onehunga, Howick, Otahuhu or Panmure, provided they served the 'Crown' for seven years. [NZ Fencible Society].
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Marks Boulcotts farm Stockade, being the most advanced post of the regular troops in 1846. Here 200 natives on 16th May under Rangihaeata's orders and led by Te Karam of the Ngati Haua te Rangi, Upper Wanganui, were repulsed by a garrison of 50 men of the 58th Regiment. Memorial- : (Military Road, Hutt County) The bodies of 6 Imperial men who fell rest nearby: Killed: L/Cpl James Dockrell, Privates William Allen, Robert Brett, Thomas Bolt, J. McFadden, T. Sonham. Died of wounds and buried at Wellington: L/Sgt E. Ingram, 58th Regt, Pvte James French, 99th Regt. Accidentally killed: Sgt Hicks, Armed Consty, Pvte J. Swan, Hutt Militia.
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On 19 December, the Headquarters and greater part of the 58th Regiment arrived back in Sydney - Captain Laye and 180 men had remained in New Zealand on detachment at Wanganui where they constructed the "Rutland" stockade. Five natives having murdered a settlers family were arrested, but the district Chiefs assembled 700 men to rescue them. Captain Laye at once ordered a court-martial of sub-alterns, tried the murderers and hanged four without delay. The Maori immediately attacked the settlement on May 19, 1847 but were repulsed with heavy loss.[Short History of the 58th Regiment].
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In December, Edmund Woodward was detached at Windsor, New South Wales. [4th quarter 58th Foot muster return].

1847
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During May, Edmund Woodward was on guard duty in New South Wales. [2nd quarter 58th Foot muster return].
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On 1 June, Charles Jefferson Beswick's pension commenced at C.P., 1/- per day, from the Royal New Zealand Fencible Corp. [Fencible Records].
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In June, Edmund Woodward was on detachment to Goat Island, Sydney. [2nd quarter 58th Foot muster return].
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In June, headquarters and the greater part of the 58th Regiment returned to New Zealand (Headquarters Auckland). Lieutenant-Colonel Wynyard being the senior officer assumed the command of the troops in the Colony, and retained it until 9 October 1847, when Major-General Pitt arrived. [Historical Records of the 58th Regiment by R. Wallace (1893)].
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In July, a peace settlement was arranged in New Zealand after the attack on Wanganui and the first New Zealand war came to an end. [Short History of the 58th Regiment].
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On 5 August, Charles Jefferson Beswick and Harriet Beswick with Children, Harriett and Elizabeth disembarked the "Ramillies" in Auckland, New Zealand. [Entry in the Shipping Index at Auckland Public Library and Fencible Records]. See: Notice to Pensioners Selected for Enrolment in the NZ Force [War Office - 19 April 1849].
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In September, Edmund Woodward was present in New South Wales. [3rd quarter 58th Foot muster return].
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On 8 October the "Minerva" arrived at Auckland from Gravesend having departed there on 1 June 1847 with a detachment of Scotish Fencibles (Howick settlement). Master: Mc Brath.
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On 11 October the "Sir Robert Sale" arrived at Auckland from Gravesend having departed there on 13 Jan 1847 with a detachment of Irish Fencibles (Onehunga settlement). Master: Loader.
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On 2nd November 1847, Archibald McVicar and Christina McKellar married, at Barony, Lanark, Scotland.
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On 26 November the "Sir George Seymour" arrived at Auckland from Gravesend having departed there on 12 April 1847 with a detachment of English and Irish Fencibles (Howick settlement). Master: TW Millman.
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In November, Edmund Woodward was on guard duty in Auckland, New Zealand. [4th quarter 58th Foot muster return].
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On 3 November, the usual half-yearly inspection of the troops in garrison took place on Wednesday last. Early in the foremoon, the whole of the available force of the 58th Regiment, not doing duty as guards, was drawn out on the parade ground in the barrack square, and shortly before eleven o'clock, formed in line in readinesss to receive the Commander of the Forces. On Major General Pitt appearing soon after in front, the troops presented arms, the band playing and the regimental and royal colours displayed. Close order was then resumed, the battalion formed into companies, and marched past the General, first in ordinary, then in quick time, and lastly in close column, after which they again formed into line in open order. The Major General then passed along the ranks, minutely inspecting the men, their arms and accoutrements, and on returning to the front was again saluted with presented arms. The gallant Major General was understood to have complimented Colonel Wynyard on the soldier-like appearance of the men, their high state of disipline, and general effectiveness. The barracks, provisions anbd other minutie, afterwards underwent a close examination, which terminated a general inspection. Major General Pitt was on foot, and attended by Ensign Wynyard, 58th regiment, acting aide-camp, Lieut.-Colonel Bolten, R. E., and other officers. On Thursday a general review of the regiment in heavy marching order, each man provided with twenty five rounds of blank cartridge, was appointed to take place, but owing to the wetness of the morning it stands deferred. In the afternoon, Major General Pitt, with his lady, a number of other ladies, and several naval officers, partook of a sumptuous lunch in the officers mess room of the 58th, the excellent band of that regiment, playing some very pleasent overtures on the green outside. HMS Calliope has bought up number five company of the 58th. The whole were disembarked on thursday afternoon with the exception of six and one wounded man left on board. It is understood that Major General Pitt (after perfecting some contemplated barracks improvements, tending to afford means of recreation and amusement for the men,) will proceed to the Bay of Islands, to inspect the troops there, and afterwards, probably pay a temporary visit to the southward in H. M. Steamer Inflexible. [The New Zealander].
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1848
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On 1 January, Thomas Copley and Mary Copley were married at the Cathedral and Parish Church, Manchester, England.
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On 23 January the "Clifton" arrived at Auckland from Galway having departed there on 26 September 1847 with a detachment of Irish Fencibles (Panmure settlement). Master: G Kettlewell.
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On 13 May, Edmund Woodward was granted good conduct pay of 1d per day while on guard duty, presumably at Battalion headquarters in Auckland. [2nd quarter 58th Foot muster return].
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On 16 May 1848 the "Ann" arrived at Auckland from Belfast having departed there on 25 December 1847 with a detachment of Irish Fencibles (Otahuhu settlement). Master: CS Walker.
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On 1 August: Death of Elizabeth Beswick, daughter of Charles Jefferson Beswick and Harriet Beswick at Onehunga, New Zealand.
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On 9 November: Birth of Samuel Beswick, to Charles Jefferson Beswick and Harriet Beswick at Onehunga, New Zealand.

1849
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Throughout 1849, Edmund Woodward was present in Auckland, New Zealand. [Quarterly 58th Foot muster returns].
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On 23 February 1849, Margaret McVICAR was born to Christina McVicar and Archibald McVicar at Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland. See "Euphemus" Passenger list.
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On 16 June the "Berhampore" arrived at Auckland from Gravesend having departed there on 7 Mar 1849 with a detachment of UK Fencibles (Onehunga settlement). Master: JB Smith.
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John Copley was born about 1849/50 to Thomas Copley and Mary Copley at Manchester [Census return dated 7 April 1861 - Hope Place, Gorton].
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On 18 September the "Oriental Queen" arrived at Auckland from Gravesend having departed there on 16 May 1849 with a detachment of English and Irish Fencibles (Howick, Onehunga, Panmure settlements). Master: Thomas.

1850
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On 19 May, William Carter and Ellen Barlow were married at the Cathedral and Parish Church, Manchester.
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On 4 November, John Beswick was born to Charles Jefferson Beswick and Harriet Beswick at St. Peters Church, Onehunga.
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1851
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On 24 February, Edmund Woodward and Harriett Beswick were married at St. Peters Church, Onehunga. See also: Storey Letter
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In June, the French Corvette "Alcmine" of 32 guns was wrecked on the west coast of the Colony (NZ). A party of the 58th Regiment was at once sent to the aid of the crew, and conducted them overland to Auckland, where the officers and sailors were housed in the barracks for about six weeks. The hospitality of the Regiment was fittingly acknowledged in a complimentary letter addressed by the French Captain to Colonel Wynyard, and later the Regiment was the recipient of an oil painting of the "Alcmine". [Short History of the 58th Regiment].
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On 19 October, Wilhelm Emil PETERS, was born in Worpswede, Germany.
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On 27 October: Birth of Elizabeth Jane Woodward (later Smith) to Edmund Woodward and Harriett Woodward at St. Peters Church, Onehunga.

1853
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On 2 January, Richard Beswick was born to Charles Jefferson Beswick and Harriet Beswick at St. Peters Church, Onehunga.
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On 2 July, Edmund Woodward was awarded good conduct pay of 2d per day. Detached to the Bay of Islands. [3rd quarter 58th Foot Muster return].
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During December, Edmund Woodward was present on guard duty in Auckland. [4th quarter 58th Foot Muster return].

1854
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On 24 April, Charles Jefferson Beswick was granted one acre of land, Onehunga Township, Waitemata Parish. [Fencibles land grant index].
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During April, Edmund Woodward was present on picket duty in Auckland. [2nd quarter 58th Foot Muster return].
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In June, Edmund Woodward was present on guard duty in Auckland. [2nd quarter 58th Foot Muster return].
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On 25 June, Richard Beswick died, son of Charles Jefferson Beswick and Harriet Beswick.
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On 4 August 1854, Chas Beswick was granted five acres of land, section SML, Lot 41, Waitemata Parish. [Fencibles land grant index].
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On 25 December, Peter Carter was born to William Carter and Ellen Carter at Openshaw, England..
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1855
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On 24 April, Charles Jefferson Beswick was granted one acre of land, Onehunga Township, Waitemata Parish. [Fencibles land grant index].
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On 9 April, Archibald McVicor disembarked the brig "Drover" in Auckland, New Zealand, from Melbourne. See Passenger List.
  •  
On 27 April, Eva Beswick was born to Charles and Harriet Beswick at Onehunga, New Zealand.
  •  
In 1855, peace was threatened at Taranaki by a dispute between Maori tribes. Three companies of the 58th Regiment were dispatched to New Plymouth under Major Nugent whose firmness and good judgement saved the Colony from a serious war. [Short History of the 58th Regiment]
  •  
In August, Edmund Woodward was detached at Taranaki. [3rd quarter 58th Foot Muster return]
  •  
On 16 September, Edmund Woodward was born to Edmund and Harriett Woodward at Onehunga
  •  
In December, Edmund Woodward was on detachment at Taranaki throughout. [4th quarter 58th Foot Muster return]

1856
  •  
On 28 June, Ann Copley (later Carter) was born to Thomas and Mary Copley at Gorton, Manchester, England.
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1857
  •  
In 1857, news was received in Auckland of the outbreak of the Indian mutiny and though the Regiment was then under orders to return to England, every Officer and man of the 58th Regiment volunteered for active service. The offer was, however, declined by the home authorities. [Short History of the 58th Regiment]
  •  
On 12 February, Christina McVicars and Margaret McVicars disembarked the "Euphemus" at Auckland, New Zealand, from London. See Passenger List.
  •  
On 31 February, Edmund Woodward discharged from the 58th Regiment of Foot in Auckland with a gratuity of nine months pay. [lst quarter 58th Foot muster return;"Discharged in NZ" by Hugh and Lyn Hughs]
  •  
On 22 June, Benjamin Beswick was born to Charles and Harriet Beswick at Onehunga, New Zealand
  •  
On 29 September, Thomas Woodward was born to Edmund and Harriett Woodward at Onehunga, New Zealand

1858
  •  
On 17 November, the 58th Regiment embarked for England. Only 16 Officers and 194 Non-commissioned Officers and men came home, over 1100 settled down as Colonists in the country which, after nearly fourteen years service, they had come to regard as their own. [Historical Records of the 58th Regiment by R. Wallace (1893)]

1859
  •  
On the 20 March, Christina MacVicar, daughter of Archibald MacVicar and Christina MacVicar died in Auckland, New Zealand.
  •  
On 14 September, William was born to Edmund and Harriett Woodward at Onehunga, New Zealand.
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1860
  •  
On 2 February, Luke Beswick was born to Charles and Harriet Beswick, at Onehunga, New Zealand
  •  
On 14 November, Archibald MacVicar was born to Archibald and Christina MacVicar at Auckland, New Zealand
  •  
On 17 December, Samuel Beswick, son of Charles and Harriet Beswick, died, aged 12 years

1861
  •  
On 7 April, the Census Return for Hope Place, Gorton, England records Thomas and Mary Copley and two children, John and Ann. Also resident at Hope Place was the family of Thomas' brother Alfred, including Alfred's wife Sarah, and children
  •  
The Census Return for the Parish of St. Barnabas, Openshaw township records: William Carter (head), married, age 36, Overlooker at cotton mill, born Buckingham; Ellen Carter (wife) age 33, born Manchester, Lancashire; Hurton (daughter) age 11, Scholar, born Manchester; Peter (son) age 6, Scholar, born Bradford; James William (son) age 11[mths?]; Robert (son) age 1 mth
  •  
On 1 October, Mary Jane Woodward was born to Edmund and Harriett Woodward at Onehunga, New Zealand

1862
  •  
On 8 March, Archibald MacVicar, died aged 37 years, in Auckland.
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1864
  •  
20 June, Daily Southern Cross, Volume XX, Issue 2158, Page 3: "On Saturday morning an inquest was held before Dr. Philson, at the Hibernian Hotel, Onehunga, on the body of. Budget Purcell, the wife of a pensioner living in Onehunga, who died in the lock-up from the effects of intemperance. Hasty deposed: I am constable at Onehunga. Between three and four o'clock, p.m., on Friday night, Mr. Mellampy sent a boy for me, saying I was wanted at the chapel. I went over and found the deceased lying inside the Catholic chapel. With Mr. Mellampy's assistance I got her on my back and carried her almost to Queen Street, when she slipped off my back, and I leaned her against Dr. Weckes' fence. A man mimed Laring helped me again to get her on my back, and I carried her to the lock up. After she had been in the cell a little time I threw a cloak over her. As she did not, however, show signs of animation I went for Dr. Weckes. He visited her immediately. He directed me to give her a glass of warm brandy and water, and to put a bottle of warm water to her stomach and feet. I did so. Shortly afterwards her husband came and gave her more brandy, but she was so exhausted that it had to be administered in a teaspoon. I never heard her speak or recognise anyone till she died, about 7pm. When she died Mrs. Beswick, a man named Woodward, Mr Purcell, and several others were present in the cell. I think that she died more from starvation and cold than from the immediate effects of intoxication. - Dr. Weckes deposed: About 4 p.m. on Friday, Hasty, the last witness, came for me to visit a woman lying in the lock-up. I went down and visited her. I found her in a state of torpor, having no pulse. I considered the case hopeless. I ordered hot brandy to be administered to try to revive her. I was coming again to visit her, when Hasty informed me she was dead. In my opinion her death proceeded from exposure to cold and from the immediate want of food in the stomach. - Mrs. Beswick stated that she had known deceased for 17 years. For the last four or five years she had been given to very intemperate habits. - Mr. Purcell deposed: I am husband of deceased. On returning from Auckland where I had been driving horses, about five o'clock, I heard that deceased was in the lockup. I was with her till she died. She was of intemperate habits. I could not live with her. - Verdict: "We find that deceased died through starvation and cold brought on by intemperance."

1865
  •  
On 17 November, Henry Woodward was born to Edmund and Harriett Woodward at Onehunga, New Zealand

1867
  •  
28 March, extract from the Daily Southern Cross: SUPREME COURT - Wednesday. SITTING IN BANCO. [Before his Honor Mr. Justice J. S. Moore.] "Charles Beswick deposed: I had a contract to do fencing for Mr. Graham. I asked Mr. Dalton to point me out the lines of road - the gentleman with the spectacles. He did not do so. I have been constantly employed on the island [Motutapu]. I saw no pegs or cuttings. Mr. Graham and Mr. Jones gave me the line where the fence was to go along. I don't know how Mr. Dalton was employed. Cross-examined: I entered upon the contract in the beginning of June. I don't know when Mr. Dalton first came to the island. I asked him to point the line of main road. Mr. Graham pointed out the line of road to me in the same month..."

1868
  •  
On 15 July, John Woodward was born to Edmund and Harriett Woodward at Onehunga, New Zealand

1869
  •  
On 24 June, Wednesday, at Onehunga Magistrates Court, before J. J. Symonds, Esq., R. M., "Wife Desertion - Beswick vs Beswick"

1870
  •  
On 17 January, Charles Jefferson Beswick wrote his Last Will and Testament.
  •  
On 21 January, Charles Jefferson Beswick died at Onehunga, New Zealand, aged 66 years. Cause of death: Stomach disease
  •  
On 28 February, Sophia Woodward was born to Edmund and Harriett Woodward, at Onehunga, New Zealand

1871
  •  
On 7/8 December, Christina MacVicar, nee McKellar, died. Cause of death: Excessive drinking. [Inquest at Newton - 1871]
  •  
On 11 December, the "Daily Southern Cross" and "New Zealand Herald" newspapers published articles concerning an enquiry held at Mr. Lawless' Newton Hotel into the death of Christina McVicar.
Southern Cross Newspaper: 11 December 1871 - Click here for full story
  •  
On 24 December, Caroline Woodward was born to Edmund and Harriett Woodward, at Onehunga, New Zealand.
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1873
  •  
On 13 December, Agnes Woodward was born to Edmund and Harriett Woodward, at Onehunga, New Zealand

1875
  •  
On 17 January, Peter Carter and Ann Copley, daughter of Thomas and Mary Copley, married at Heaton Norris, England

1876
  •  
About 1876, Mary Francis Carter was born to Peter and Ann Carter, (England)

1877
  •  
On 22 November 1877, James William Carter was born to Peter and Ann Carter, (England)

1878
  •  
About 1878, Alice Maud Carter was born to Peter and Ann Carter, (England)

1879
  •  
On 2 May 1879, John Thomas Carter was born to Peter and Ann Carter, at Gorton, England. Thomas later married Edith Emma Lay at Auckland on 10 November 1906, New Zealand (10 November 1906). Thomas died 21 June 1945 at 7 Killarney Road, Hamilton and is buried at Hamilton East Cemetery alongside his wife, Edith

1881
  •  
On 5 May 1881, Ester Carter was born to Peter and Ann Carter, at Gorton, England
  •  
On 17 May, Archibald MacVicar and Harriet Woodward, daughter of Edmund and Harriet Woodward, married at Auckland, New Zealand
  •  
On 18 November, Mary Jane Beswick was born to Luke and Sarah Beswick, at Onehunga, New Zealand
  •  
The 1881 British Census return (Rusholme, Lancashire) records at No.8 Ivy Street, Gorton: Jas.Wm. Carter age 23 (head), Iron Turner, born Manchester; Robert Barlow age 79 (Grandfather), Dyer, born Radcliffe, Lancashire; Sarah Ellen Carter aged 19 (sister), Calico Weaver, born Openshaw; Mary Alice Carter aged 13 (sister), Scholar, born Openshaw
  •  
The 1881 British Census return (Gorton, Lancashire) records at No.58 Victoria Road, Gorton: Peter Carter age 28, (head), married, Labourer, born Openshaw; Ann Carter age 24 (head), married, born Gorton, Lancashire; James Wm. Carter age 4 (son), Scholar, born Gorton; Alice Maud Carter age 3 (daughter), born Gorton; John Thomas Carter age 1 (son), born Gorton; Robert Carter age 21 (brother), Fitter (E), born Openshaw
  •  
The Manukau Electoral Roll for the years 1881; 1884; 1887 records the following: 1464 Woodward, William, residential, Onehunga, gentleman; 1722 McVickers, Archibald, residential, slaughterman.
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1882
  •  
On 26 January, Archibald MacVicar was born to Archibald and Harriet MacVicar, at Onehunga, New Zealand
  •  
On 13 February, Archibald MacVicar, son of Archibald and Harriet MacVicar died aged 17 Days. Cause of death: "Overdose of chlorodyne ignorantly administered by his mother". The Webster Dictionary, 1913, describes Chlorodyne as: Chlorodyne [From chlorine, in imitation of anodyne.] (Med.) A patent anodyne medicine, containing opium, chloroform, Indian hemp, etc. See: Death by Poisoning at Onehunga.
Chlorodyne Advert 1918

1883
  •  
On 5 February, Harriette MacVicar was born to Archibald and Harriet MacVicar, at Onehunga, New Zealand
  •  
On 6 August, Alfred Ernest Carter was born to Peter and Ann Carter, at Gorton, England
  •  
On 6 December, Christina MacVicar was born to Archibald and Harriet MacVicar, at Onehunga, New Zealand
  •  
On 19 December, Christina MacVicar, daughter of Archibald and Harriet MacVicar died aged 13 Days. Cause of death: Premature birth

1884
  •  
On 22 January, Peter and Ann Carter, nee Copley, with Children; James, Alice, John and Esther disembarked the "Earl Derby" at Maryborough, Queensland, Australia.The "Earl Derby" departed Plymouth, England on 27 October 1883. Remarks: Free. See [Earl Derby Passenger List]
  •  
On 10 November, Archibald MacVicar was born to Archibald and Harriet MacVicar, at Onehunga, New Zealand
  •  
On 10 November, Archibald MacVicar, son of Archibald and Harriet MacVicar died aged 12 hours. Cause of death: Debility.
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1885
  •  
The Depression in New Zealand: 1885 to 1900
The 1880s and 1890s have come to be known as the long depression in New Zealand. In the winters there was visible hardship and distress. Those who had come out in the 1870s sent less positive messages home, and free passages were ended. Fewer new settlers arrived, and people began to leave. They went particularly to Australia, where �marvellous Melbourne� experienced a boom in the 1880s. In 1888 about 10,000 more people left New Zealand than arrived, and in the years from 1881 to 1900 the net gain from migration was only about 40,000 (almost 100,000 less than in the decade of the 1870s). By the dawn of the 20th century New Zealand had fewer foreign-born people than 20 years before. The proportion of the non-Maori population who were born overseas went from a half to under a third. New Zealand lost its status as an immigrant nation. [Te Ara: The Encyclopedia of New Zealand]
  •  
On 23 May, Robert Carter was born to Peter and Ann Carter, at Saltwater Creek Road, Maryborough, Queensland, Australia.

1886
  •  
On 5 January, Elsie Lilian MacVicar was born to Archibald and Harriet MacVicar, at Onehunga, New Zealand
  •  
On 9 August, Mabel Ethel Carter was born to Peter and Ann Carter, at Saltwater Creek Road, Maryborough, Queensland, Australia. She married Charles Parsons on 8 February 1908 and died 4 November 1959 aged 73. Mabel is buried at Maungaturoto Cemetery, New Zealand, alongside her husband, Charles.

1887
  •  
On 13 February, Constance Mary Woodward was born to William (farmer from Onehunga) and Laura Woodward
  •  
On 16 August, William Alexander MacVicar was born to Archibald and Harriet MacVicar, at Onehunga, New Zealand

1888
  •  
On 2 October 1888, Albert Ernest Carter was born to Peter and Ann Carter, at Maryborough, Queensland, Australia, He married Florence ? of Laingholm. Albert died 15 January 1958

1889
  •  
On 5 February, Robert Fergusson Strong was born to Robert and Mary Ann Strong, nee Thompson, at Onehunga, New Zealand
  •  
On 15 May, Eva Warner, nee Beswick, daughter of Charles and Harriet Beswick died aged 34 years. (Married John Benedict Warner 03/05/1873)
  •  
On 12 July, Eva May MacVicar (later Carter) was born to Archibald and Harriet MacVicar, at Onehunga, New Zealand
  •  
On 22 November, an application for relief was entered by Benjamin Beswick, son of Charles and Harriet Beswick. Listed are Benjamin, his wife Louise [Jane Filmer b. 3 Oct 1862 - 26 Aug 1935], and their children: Eva, Benjamin, Charles, Mary, and Julia. Reason: "Sickness". [Hospital and Charitable Aid Board records held at National Archives, NZ]
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1891
  •  
On 29 April, a four roomed dwelling house with detached kitchen, which was on the Saltwater Creek Road, Maryborough, Queensland, occupied by Mr. Peter Carter and family, was completely demolished by fire. See also: Local News
  •  
On 16 June, Emily Maria MacVicar was born to Archibald and Harriet MacVicar, at Onehunga, New Zealand

1894
  •  
On 20 February, Hilda MacVicar was born to Archibald and Harriet MacVicar, at Onehunga, New Zealand
  •  
On 22 April, John Edmund Woodward was born to John (Labourer from Onehunga) and Sarah Woodward
  •  
On 11 May, Edmund WOODWARD makes application for relief to the Auckland Hospital and Charitable Aid Board. Registered No. 9050. [Refer: YCAB A493/63 Page 9 - Auckland Archives]:
Date of Application Name/Address Age Years in Colony Names of Relatives Liable to Contribute Towards Support of Applicant
 11 May 1894   WOODWARD, Edmund   70   30   Ann Elizabeth SMITH, Newton, 8 children, husband bootmaker. 
   WOODWARD, Harriett  63    Elizabeth BARR, Huia, 9 children, husband bushman.
   and      Mary STOREY, Huia, 6 children.
   son WOODWARD, John  25    Harriett McVICKERS, Onehunga, 5 children, husband butcher.
   wife WOODWARD, Sarah  20    Sophia KILGOUR, Huia, 1 child, husband bushman.
   child WOODWARD, John      Edmond WOODWARD, 32, 2 children, bushman, Manganui.
         Henry WOODWARD, single, gumdigger, Northcape.
  •  
On 17 December, Bertram Carter was born to Peter and Ann Carter, at Maryborough, Australia

1895
  •  
On 26 August, Ethel Myrtle MacVicar was born to Archibald and Harriet MacVicar, at Onehunga, New Zealand

1896
  •  
On 4 May, Harriett Woodward, nee Beswick, died aged 62 years, at Onehunga, New Zealand

1897
  •  
On 10 December, George Henry MacVicar was born to Archibald and Harriet MacVicar, at Onehunga, New Zealand

1899
  •  
July 1899: Eva MacVicar is recorded in the Onehunga Public School Register; First Class; Teacher - M. G. Kirkbride; Register: July 1899 - December 1899; Quarter ending September 30th and December 31st; Admission No. 2074; McVICARS, Eva; aged 8 yrs (She was in the same class as her 1st cousin, Carrie Woodward, daughter of Edmund Woodward and Anne Clark) See [Certificates]
  •  
1 August: Date of statement by Harriet Beswick (nee Rowland) regarding Charles Jefferson Beswick's original land grant at Onehunga. Includes their marriage details at Manchester, England, and birth dates of all their children [Lands and Deeds Department, Auckland].
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1901
  •  
On 28 January, Harriet MacVicar was born to Archibald and Harriet MacVicar, at Onehunga, New Zealand
  •  
On 24 December, Eva Gladys Stevens (later Strong) was born to William and Sarah Jane Stevens (nee Wells), at 1 Princess Road, Croydon, England

1902
  •  
On 26 January, Ellen Carter was born to Peter and Ann Carter, at Woodstock Street, Maryborough, Queensland, Australia

1904
  •  
On 20 May, Edmund Woodward, formerly H.M.58th Regiment of Foot, died, aged 70 years, at his son-in-laws residence, Mr F. Smith, Newton Road, Auckland, New Zealand. (Frederick Smith married Elizabeth Ann Woodward 30 June 1874)
  •  
About 1904, Peter and Ann Carter, "crossed the creek" to Auckland, New Zealand, from Queensland, Australia
  •  
On 12 December, Harriet Beswick, nee Rowland, died aged about 82 years at Onehunga, New Zealand

1910
  •  
On 13 July, Robert Carter and Eva May MacVicar, daughter of Archibald and Harriet MacVicar were married at St. Peters Church, Onehunga

1913
  •  
About this time, Vincent Alexander Carter was born to Robert and Eva May Carter, nee MacVicar

1914
  •  
During 1914-1920, Robert Fergusson Strong Reg. No. S/2373 was on active service in the Seaforth Highlander Regiment. Awarded for his war service were the 1914-15 Star, and the War Medal, awarded to those who saw service in any theatre of war between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915 and the Victory Medal, issued in bronze to all those who had received the 1914 or 1914/15 stars, and to most of those issued with the British War Medal. It is inscribed on reverse "The Great War for Civilisation 1914-19".

Records relating to Robert Strong's service with the Seaforth Highlander Regiment were destroyed during bombing (the Blitz) of London in 1940. He attained the rank of Regimental Sergeant-Major.
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1918
  •  
Black November - the 1918 influenza epidemic that caused the death of at least 6000 Europeans within New Zealand and more than 300 soldiers overseas. An estimated 2160 Maori died (death registration for Maori was not compulsory at the time). An estimated 20 million people worldwide died, including 548,000 in the U.S.A. See also New Zealand's Greatest Epidemic: "The Spanish Influenza"
  •  
On 14 November, Harriet MacVicar, nee Woodward died, aged 55 years, at Angle Street, Onehunga, New Zealand. Cause of death: Influenza and Pneumonia.
Government Notice - Treatment of Convalescents from influenza.

1919
  •  
On 13 November, Robert Fergusson Strong (Snr.) was pronounced bankrupt [Refer: 13984 The London Gazette, 18 November 1919 - High Court No. 524 of 1918].
Adjudication - Robert Fergusson Strong

1923
  •  
On 30 January, Robert Fergusson Strong (Jnr.) and Eva Gladys Stevens, daughter of William and Sara Jane Stevens were married in Nice, France

1924
  •  
In 1924, Robert and Eva Gladys Strong, nee Stevens, emigrated to New Zealand, disembarking the "Remuera" at Wellington, 1924. [See: Robert Fergusson Strong's Diary and Remuera]
  •  
On 25 July, Elizabeth Beswick, wife of William Bryant Beswick, died at Onehunga
  •  
On 10 August 1924, Robert Carter was awarded the Long Service Medal after serving 5-years as a fireman at the Newmarket Volunteer Fire Brigade. See also: Local News

When the Newmarket Borough was established its first Mayor, Mr Suiter, succeeded in starting the Newmarket Volunteer Fire Brigade. It received official recognition on June 24, 1896. The brigade went out of existence in 1931 when the Newmarket Fire Board was constituted. It entered into an agreement with the Auckland Fire Board for fire protection. In 1933 the Newmarket Fire Board ceased to exist and the district became part of the area under the jurisdiction of the Auckland Metropolitan Fire Board
Long Service Medal - Robert Carter 1924Long Service Medal (front) - Robert Carter

1927
  •  
Economic Downturn:
An economic downturn hit New Zealand in 1927 and became a full depression from 1929. The country was no longer an attractive destination, and government assistance tailed off before being abandoned in all but name in 1931. The Department of Immigration was shut down in 1932. From that year until 1935, 10,000 more people left New Zealand than arrived. In 1935 there was only one assisted migrant. The doors of New Zealand were essentially closed. [Te Ara: The Encyclopedia of New Zealand]
  •  
On 23 January, Robert CARTER makes application for relief to the Auckland Hospital Board. Reason: "Lack of Work". At the time they were resident at 31 Hill Street, Onehunga. Registered No. 9394a. [Refer: YCAB A493/64 or 15247/1a, Page 256 - Auckland Archives]:
Date of Application Name/Address Age Occupation Names of Relatives Liable to Contribute Towards Support of Applicant
 23 January 1927  CARTER, Robert  42  Plumber  mother  Ann CARTER, widow.
   CARTER, Eva May  38  Dom. Duties  father-in-law  Archibald MacVICAR (63), retired farmer, Capt. Springs Road, Te Papapa
   CARTER, Vincent Alex  14    brother  J. W. CARTER (50), iron moulder, wife and 4 children, Mt. Eden Road
   CARTER, Esther May  13    brother  Albert E. CARTER (39), labourer, wife and 3 children, St. Heliers Bay
   CARTER, Gwendoline  7    brother  John J. CARTER (40), cook, wife and 6 children, Hamilton
   CARTER, Myrtle June  3    
  •  
On 18 March, Robert Fergusson Strong was awarded the Royal Victorian Medal.The Royal Victorian Medal was established by Queen Victoria in April 1896 and is conferred upon civilian and non-commissioned military personnel who have performed personal services to the Sovereign or to members of the Royal Family. see: Royal Victorian Medal
Robert Strong standing in front of train carriage

1928
  •  
On 5 March, James William Carter (Jim), was born to Robert and Eva May Carter, nee MacVicar, at Onehunga, New Zealand. James William was the youngest child. Brothers and sisters of James William were: Vincent Alexander (born abt. 1913), Ester May, Florence Gwenolene, Marian, Robert, Myrtle, June, and a baby still born.
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1929
  •  
On 21 October, Luke Beswick, son of Charles and Harriet Beswick, died at Manganui Hospital. (Luke married Sarah Ann Given about 1881)

1931
  •  
On 23 February, Doreen Strong was born to Robert and Eva Gladys Strong, nee Stevens, at Wellington, New Zealand. Doreen Strong was the youngest child. Siblings include: Hilda Mary, Jean, Gladys and Muriel

1946
  •  
James William Carter enlisted to serve in the New Zealand Army (2NZEF). He put his age up to 20 to join after consent from his father. He served with the Commonwealth Occupation Force in Japan (J-Force) for more than a year, then discharged from the army in New Zealand and took on an apprentiship as carpenter and joiner. See: Japanese Invasion Money
The Japanese government printed currency for use in countries other than Japan
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1947
  •  
Before 1947, the New Zealand Military Forces consisted of a Permanent Staff, to which all regular soldiers belonged, and a Territorial Force. In 1947 the Military Forces were reorganised to become the New Zealand Army consisting of Regular and Territorial Forces. An Infantry Corps was also created which consisted of the then fourteen Territorial infantry regiments and a new regular regiment. The New Zealand Regiment, of which the three battalions then serving in the Commonwealth Occupation Force in Japan became the First to Third Battalions. When this Force was withdrawn in 1949, the three battalions were deactivated. [A Short History of the R.N.Z.I.R in South East Asia]

1948
  •  
On 14 February, Private James William Carter (Army No. 827288) at age 19, is discharged from the New Zealand Military Forces on termination of engagement. He served for a total of 1 year, 347 days - 222 days in New Zealand and 1 year, 125 days "beyond New Zealand" (Japan). [Certificate of Discharge No. 70208]
  •  
On 30 September, James William Carter (NZ 12459) at age 20, enlisted to serve in the Royal New Zealand Navy. He served at HMNZS Tamaki from 30 September to 29 January 1949 then at HMNZS Philomel as Ordinary Seaman until 15 February 1949 when he was discharged "Physically unfit for Naval Service". Conduct: "Very good". [Certificate of Service document].
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1950
  •  
On 27 May, James William Carter married Doreen Strong at St. Marks Anglican Church, Remuera, Auckland.

1957
  •  
On 6 December, at age 29, James William Carter re-enlisted to serve in the New Zealand Army and was posted to the Auckland Regiment (Service No. T209133). [Certificate of Service]
  •  
The 1st Battalion New Zealand Regiment was reactivated in 1957 and joined 28 Commonwealth Infantry Brigade on anti-terrorist operations in Perak, Malaya in that year. [A Short History of the R.N.Z.I.R in South East Asia]
3rd (Auckland) Infantry Regiment

1958
  •  
On 6 December, James William Carter was promoted to Lance-Corporal. [Certificate of Service]

1959
  •  
The 2nd Battalion was reactivated and during November 1959 relieved the 1st Battalion in Peral, Malaya. [A Short History of the R.N.Z.I.R in South East Asia]
  •  
On 6 December, James William Carter was promoted to Corporal. [Certificate of Service]

1960
British Empire Medal (Military Division)
  •  
On 31 December, James William Carter was awarded the British Empire Medal (Military Division)

1963
  •  
It was announced that a new single regiment of infantry would be formed which would include the amalgamation of the 1st and 2nd Battalions to become the 1st Battalion Depot, and the 1st Battalion then stationed at Terendak Camp, Malaya, retained its identity. [A Short History of the R.N.Z.I.R in South East Asia]
  •  
On 6 July, James William Carter was promoted to Sergeant. [Certificate of Service]
  •  
James William Carter was posted to Burnham Military Camp.

1964
  •  
On 1st April 1964, the ten regiments of the Infantry Corps became seven battalions of the Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment, the 1st Battalion New Zealand Regiment, becoming the 1st Battalion of the new Regiment. As it is recruited on a national basis and has no provincial links, the 1st Battalion Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment claims descent from all previous Territorial infantry regiments as well as the New Zealand Regiment. Except for periods during 1965 and 1966 when it was attached to 19 British and 99 Gurkha Brigade, the 1st Battalion has served with 28 Commonwealth Brigade in Malaysia and Singapore with companies detached for service in South Vietnam between May 1967 and December 1971. When 28 Commonwealth Brigade was disbanded in October 1971 the 1st Battalion came under command of 28 ANZUK Brigade where it remained until 1974 when it became part of NZ Force. [A Short History of the R.N.Z.I.R in South East Asia]
  •  
James William Carter was posted to Terendak Camp, Malaya.
  •  
On 5 May, James William Carter was present in Malaya. See Tiny Daily is keenly read by N.Z. Troops. [New Zealand Herald]
1 RNZIR Flag
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1966
  •  
On 6 July, James William Carter was promoted to Staff-Sergeant. [Certificate of Service]
  •  
James William Carter was posted to Waiouru Military Camp, NZ.

1968
Vietnam coin 1968 (D�`ng)
  •  
On 29 January, James William Carter left for active service (Vietnam) on RNZAF flight NSL/51 to Saigon. He served in Vietnam 1968 through to 1969. HQ V FORCE - RNZIR.

1969
  •  
On 6 July, James William Carter (Army Service No. T209133) was promoted to Warrant Officer, Class two. [Certificate of Service]
  •  
On 30 December, Doreen Carter, nee Strong, died aged 38.

1972
  •  
On 22 November, James William Carter was promoted to Warrant Officer, Class One. [Certificate of Service]
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1980
  •  
On 30 May, WO1 James William Carter (Army Service No. T209133) was discharged from the New Zealand Army, "Having satisfactorily completed 22.5 years service and reached retiring age for rank. [Certificate of Service]

1990
  •  
On 18 July, Jillian Carol Hales daughter of James and Doreen Carter, died aged 39.

1995
  •  
On 28 May, James William Carter died aged 67.

1996
  •  
James William Carter received the New Zealand Service Medal 1945-49 for his military service in Japan (J-Force).

2002
  •  
On 10 August, James William Carter received the New Zealand Operational Service Medal.

2006
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On 31 June, James William Carter received the Pingat Jasa Malaysia Medal (PJM). The Pingat Jasa Malaysia medal is awarded to those who served in Malaya / Malaysia for at least 90 days, between 31 August 1957 and 31 December 1966. Service in Singapore between 31 August 1957 and 9 August 1965 is also recognised by the PJM medal.
Medals awarded to
James W. CARTER
in order of wear:
1. The British Empire Medal (Military Division)
2. The New Zealand Operational Service Medal
3. The New Zealand Service Medal 1946-1949
4. The New Zealand General Service Medal 1992 (Warlike) with clasp 'Malaya 1960-64'
5. The General Service Medal 1962 with clasps "Borneo" and "Malay Peninsula"
6. The Vietnam Medal 1964-1972
7. The New Zealand Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal
8. The New Zealand Defence Service Medal
9. The Pingat Jasa Malaysia Medal (PJM)
10. The South Vietnam Campaign Medal (The Vietnam Star)

The Army Service Award was granted to James William CARTER in 1979 for services to sports administration
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